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Gambino was disappointed with both his own ''underboss'', Aniello Dellacroce and now his new ''caporegime''(Gotti was never made a capo by Gambino he was merely inducted into the Family as reward for his actions in the McBratney killing when he was released from jail), John Gotti, so Gambino reorganized. Now, with a weak heart, he decided there was to be two ''acting bosses'' who both reported to him, Dellacroce and Gambino's own brother-in-law, Paul "Big Paul" Castellano. Castellano took over the white-collar crimes in Brooklyn like union racketeering, solid and toxic waste, recycling, construction, fraud and wire fraud, while Dellacroce would have free rein over those crews who carried out more traditional, 'hands-on' Mafia activities and the blue-collar crimes, such as murder for hire, loansharking, gambling, extortion, hijacking, pier thefts, fencing, and robbery. This strategic restructuring also created confusion in the FBI in the mid 1970s as to who the official ''underboss'' in the family was. In reality, the Gambino family was split into two separate factions, with two ''underbosses'' and one ''Don''.
 
Gambino was disappointed with both his own ''underboss'', Aniello Dellacroce and now his new ''caporegime''(Gotti was never made a capo by Gambino he was merely inducted into the Family as reward for his actions in the McBratney killing when he was released from jail), John Gotti, so Gambino reorganized. Now, with a weak heart, he decided there was to be two ''acting bosses'' who both reported to him, Dellacroce and Gambino's own brother-in-law, Paul "Big Paul" Castellano. Castellano took over the white-collar crimes in Brooklyn like union racketeering, solid and toxic waste, recycling, construction, fraud and wire fraud, while Dellacroce would have free rein over those crews who carried out more traditional, 'hands-on' Mafia activities and the blue-collar crimes, such as murder for hire, loansharking, gambling, extortion, hijacking, pier thefts, fencing, and robbery. This strategic restructuring also created confusion in the FBI in the mid 1970s as to who the official ''underboss'' in the family was. In reality, the Gambino family was split into two separate factions, with two ''underbosses'' and one ''Don''.
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==Final Decision==
 
==Final Decision==

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